NHTSA Addresses Backup Camera Rules Issue

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Detroit News

Congress approved legislation in 2007 requiring the government to set rear-visibility rules by early 2011, but the ruling has faced a series of delays.

Find out what NHTSA chief David Strickland has to say currently about the ruling.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration chief David Strickland says he has no time frame for finalizing delayed rear-visibility rules that would require automakers to install back-up cameras in all new vehicles.

“We want to make sure we get it right,” Strickland said last week after a forum in New York, echoing comments he has made for months on the regulation.

Congress approved legislation in 2007 requiring the government to set rear-visibility rules by early 2011, but Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood has repeatedly exercised his power to delay the rule. The department didn’t make its last self-imposed deadline set for Dec. 31, and hasn’t set a new deadline.

The rule is one of 17 significant regulations under review, according to a monthly report from the Transportation Department. Many — including new side-impact test rules and rules ensuring people can hear hybrids and electric vehicles — are behind schedule. In one case — setting new standards for what event data recorders must capture — NHTSA cited a “lack of resources” as the reason for the delay. Additional research or need for agency discussions are cited as reasons for other delays.

“The delays here are pretty significant when you look at it in totality,” said Sean Kane, who heads Safety Research & Strategies, an auto safety firm that often works with plaintiffs’ attorneys. “The agency is fairly far behind.”

But Strickland has defended the agency’s track record, repeatedly emphasizing he wants to get data-driven regulations, rather than meet arbitrary timetables.

 

 

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