Mileage Variations Vary More Than Ever

Green Car Reports

Accord­ing to a new report from the Inter­na­tion­al Coun­cil on Clean Trans­porta­tion, the gap between rat­ed fuel effi­cien­cy and the real-world gas mileage achieved by actu­al dri­vers is increas­ing.

Get more infor­ma­tion on U.S. and Euro­pean real-world fuel rat­ings.

Accord­ing to a new report, the gap between rat­ed fuel effi­cien­cy and the real-world gas mileage achieved by actu­al dri­vers is increas­ing.

In 2001, it notes, the aver­age dif­fer­ence between rat­ed gas mileage and actu­al results was 20 per­cent or less in the U.S. and 10 per­cent or less in Europe.

By 2012, that gap had risen to 35 per­cent in the U.S. In Europe, it was 25 per­cent in 2011.

The bulk of its analy­sis applies to Euro­pean cars and dri­vers, using data gath­ered from fleets in Ger­many, the Nether­lands, Switzer­land, and the U.K.

It shows the steep­est increase in 2007 and 2008, when sev­er­al mem­ber coun­tries switched to tax­ing cars based on their rat­ed tailpipe emis­sions of car­bon diox­ide.

The report is care­ful to note up front that “noth­ing in this analy­sis sug­gests that man­u­fac­tur­ers have done any­thing ille­gal.”

Only four pages of the 88-page report apply to sim­i­lar dis­crep­an­cies in the U.S.

That analy­sis is based on vari­a­tions in “My MPG” data sub­mit­ted by users to the EPA’s FuelEconomy.gov web­site start­ing in 2004, against the offi­cial EPA fuel effi­cien­cy rat­ings.

The report sug­gests that more study is need­ed on these dis­crep­an­cies.

“For the Unit­ed States,” it con­cludes, “the data exam­ined in the con­text of this paper are seen only as a start­ing point for future analy­sis.”

 

 

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