Massachusetts No Longer a Leading Chop Shop. What Changed?

by Jon LeSage

Sit­u­a­tion:

While Mass­a­chu­setts is not one of the top 10 largest US states by pop­u­la­tion, a few years ago it was one of the lead­ing mar­kets for auto theft — a real chop shop.

In the 1970s, it was esti­mat­ed that one out of every cars in the state had been report­ed stolen. It was a noto­ri­ous state for vehi­cle theft and the chop shop under­ground indus­try.

Over the past decades, changes in tech­nol­o­gy and adop­tion of these solu­tions reversed that real­i­ty – car thefts have dropped 88% in the state since the mid-1970s.

In 2012, the city of Boston had 1,575 reports of stolen vehi­cles – but get this – in 1975, there were 28,000 vehi­cles report­ed stolen in Boston!

It’s worth not­ing that those num­bers didn’t real­ly start get­ting bet­ter until 2001. The rea­son that it start­ed get­ting bet­ter had very lit­tle to do with the police.

 

Sig­nif­i­cance:

Secu­ri­ty tech­nol­o­gy had made a huge dif­fer­ence in Mass­a­chu­setts. The pro­lif­er­a­tion of anti-theft devices, GPS track­ing, and sur­veil­lance cam­eras have made the state a tough mar­ket for the auto theft indus­try. Com­pa­nies like LoJack have played a key role in the mar­ket.

Stolen vehi­cles are get­ting much eas­i­er to locate in the state, and catch­ing the bur­glars who stole them.

Mass­a­chu­setts could lead the way for oth­er states – many state gov­ern­ments and pri­vate com­pa­nies are embrac­ing sur­veil­lance tech­nol­o­gy.

Mass­a­chu­setts is 14th largest state in Amer­i­ca based on pop­u­la­tion, but now #20 in auto theft.

Cal­i­for­nia is prime mar­ket for auto theft – its num­bers are much high­er pro­por­tion­al­ly than oth­er large states. Texas about a third small­er in pop­u­la­tion but California’s theft num­bers are about two and a half times that of Texas (see chart above for 2012 num­bers).

Per­haps Cal­i­for­nia should adopt more of the tech­nolo­gies and behav­ioral changes with dri­vers and vehi­cle own­ers that have worked well in Mass­a­chu­setts?

Source: Low­ell Sun

Sit­u­a­tion:

 

A few year ago, the state of Mass­a­chu­setts was one of the very worst mar­kets for auto theft – much larg­er in pro­por­tion to its pop­u­la­tion than oth­er states.

 

 

Those num­bers have got­ten dra­mat­i­cal­ly bet­ter – car thefts have dropped 88% since the mid-1970s. The chart above shows the top 10 auto theft mar­kets in the US last year, which Mass­a­chu­setts is no longer part of.

 

 

In 2012, the city of Boston had 1,575 reports of stolen vehi­cles – but get this – in 1975, there were 28,000 vehi­cles report­ed stolen in Boston!

 

 

How did things get so much bet­ter in the state? Well, it wasn’t because of police crack­ing down on the auto theft under­ground.

 

Sig­nif­i­cance:

 

Secu­ri­ty tech­nol­o­gy had made a huge dif­fer­ence in Mass­a­chu­setts.

 

The pro­lif­er­a­tion of anti-theft devices, GPS track­ing, and sur­veil­lance cam­eras have made the state a tough mar­ket for the auto theft indus­try.

 

Stolen vehi­cles are get­ting much eas­i­er to locate in the state, and catch­ing the bur­glars who stole them.

 

Mass­a­chu­setts could lead the way for oth­er states – many state gov­ern­ments and pri­vate com­pa­nies are embrac­ing sur­veil­lance tech­nol­o­gy.

 

Cal­i­for­nia is a state that is way out of pro­por­tion with its pop­u­la­tion-to-stolen-vehi­cle ratio. Maybe Cal­i­for­nia should study Mass­a­chu­setts tac­tics? Read on for more details on how this devel­oped in Mass­a­chu­setts.

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