GM Joins VW in ‘Climate Declaration’ Commitment

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The Detroit Bureau - May 3, 2013

General Motors has become the first automaker among major U.S. companies to sign a “Climate Declaration” collectively asserting that climate change is good business.

Find out more about the declaration Volkswagen has already signed.

General Motors has become the first automaker among 40 major U.S. companies to sign a “Climate Declaration” collectively asserting that responding to climate change is good business.

The campaign is organized by sustainable business advocacy group Ceres, a long-time critic of GM’s environmental positions over the years, and its Business for Innovative Climate & Energy Policy, or BICEP, coalition.

Signers of the declaration, such as GM, are calling for policymakers to address climate change by promoting clean energy, boosting efficiency and limiting carbon emissions..

“We want to be a change agent in the auto industry,” said Mike Robinson, GM vice president of Sustainability and Global Regulatory Affairs. “As our world faces issues like congestion and climate change, we are at the forefront in transforming the way we move, from building more efficient vehicles to partnering with car-sharing startup Relay Rides.”

Volkswagen Group has unveiled a broad effort to reduce the fuel consumption of its new vehicle fleet to a greater extent than had previously been intended.

Martin Winterkorn, chairman of the VW management board, also publicized he recent meeting with Greenpeace Chief Executive Brigitte Behrens. The meeting with the ultra-militant environmental group focused on a discussion of the Volkswagen Group’s climate protection efforts. Winterkorn emphasized the company would reach the emission target set by EU legislation of an average of 95 grams of carbon dioxide (CO2) per kilometer by 2020.

“I guarantee that we will do everything in our power to reach carbon dioxide emissions of 95 grams without any reservations. However, this will only be possible if customers accept our advanced alternative powertrains. This is of course our objective,” Winterkorn said.

 

 

 

Find out more about the declaration Volkswagen has already signed.

General Motors has become the first automaker among 40 major U.S. companies to sign a “Climate Declaration” collectively asserting that responding to climate change is good business.

The campaign is organized by sustainable business advocacy group Ceres, a long-time critic of GM’s environmental positions over the years, and its Business for Innovative Climate & Energy Policy, or BICEP, coalition.

Signers of the declaration, such as GM, are calling for policymakers to address climate change by promoting clean energy, boosting efficiency and limiting carbon emissions..

“We want to be a change agent in the auto industry,” said Mike Robinson, GM vice president of Sustainability and Global Regulatory Affairs. “As our world faces issues like congestion and climate change, we are at the forefront in transforming the way we move, from building more efficient vehicles to partnering with car-sharing startup Relay Rides.”

Volkswagen Group has unveiled a broad effort to reduce the fuel consumption of its new vehicle fleet to a greater extent than had previously been intended.

Martin Winterkorn, chairman of the VW management board, also publicized the recent meeting with Greenpeace Chief Executive Brigitte Behrens. The meeting with the ultra-militant environmental group focused on a discussion of the Volkswagen Group’s climate protection efforts. Winterkorn emphasized the company would reach the emission target set by EU legislation of an average of 95 grams of carbon dioxide (CO2) per kilometer by 2020.

“I guarantee that we will do everything in our power to reach carbon dioxide emissions of 95 grams without any reservations. However, this will only be possible if customers accept our advanced alternative powertrains. This is of course our objective,” Winterkorn said.

 

 

 

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