Best Practices for Surviving the Cellpocalypse

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By Mike Martinez

Calls to mobile phones are highly regulated and with the Federal Communications Commission’s recent rule changes pursuant to the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, dealers need to get serious about obtaining prior express written consent before October 16, 2013, to avoid the risk of losing the right to contact almost 45 percent of your customers!

Among the impacts of these new regulations is the effective prohibition of the use of technology (like your CRM system or calling technologies also used by your BDC provider) to call those mobile numbers without the express, written permission of the consumer.  Most dealers don’t realize it, but with the rapid adoption by consumers of mobile phones as their primary phone number, 45% of the numbers in the “home phone” field of the average dealer’s DMS are actually mobile phone numbers.

So what’s the best way to survive this Cellpocalypse?

Be proactive and devote an entire call campaign to the collection of express written consent. According to a recent DMEautomotive 500 record communication consent study, “Keep Calling,” 65 percent of customers contacted gave their consent for ongoing calls to their cell phones when asked. This could be the difference between a full or empty sales and service drive come next Christmas!

You can also dedicate email-marketing campaigns to educate your customers and ask for their consent as well. Link the email campaigns to a webpage where customers can provide prior express written consent. Make sure to clearly state the benefits they’ll receive in return for giving you their consent. Just be sure that you are keeping and maintaining records of your consents because the burden of proof is on YOU.

If you want to survive the coming Cellpocalypse you must start obtaining written consent NOW, or prepare to lose this vital channel of customer communication forever.

Mike Martinez is Chief Marketing Officer of DMEautomotive can be reached at info@dmeautomotive.com.

*The information provided herein is for educational and informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. Readers should always obtain the advice of independent legal counsel related to their own specific and unique circumstances.

 

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